Journal of Humanities, Arts and Social Science

ISSN Print: 2576-0556 Downloads: 190783 Total View: 1745278
Frequency: monthly ISSN Online: 2576-0548 CODEN: JHASAY
Email: jhass@hillpublisher.com
Article http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/jhass.2024.01.046

A Corpus-based Comparative Analysis on the Use of Non-lexical Filler Words in Spoken English Between Chinese EFL Learners and Native English Speakers

Qiqi Huang

School of Foreign Languages, Renmin University of China, Beijing, China.

*Corresponding author: Qiqi Huang

Published: February 29,2024

Abstract

Filler words are linguistic units that take the form of relatively short and concise expressions used by speakers during verbal communication to segment speech, especially in cases of emotional charge and the suspension of the verbal act. The present study aims to analyze the characteristics of using non-lexical filler words in spoken English by Chinese EFL learners and native English speakers. First, the study compares the use of non-lexical filler words between Chinese English majors and Chinese non-English majors. This analysis sheds light on the correlation between the use of non-lexical filler words in spoken English and English profi-ciency. A comparative analysis is conducted between Chinese EFL learners and native English speakers, exploring the similarities and differences in their use of non-lexical filler words. COLSEC and SECCL were selected as the observation corpora, representing Chinese non-English major students and Chinese English major students' use of oral English, respectively. The spoken corpus of BNC serves as the reference corpus, demonstrating how native English speakers speak. The data on overall frequencies, category distribution, and collocations of non-lexical filler words used in the three corpora are processed and retrieved using ActConc 4.4.1. Meanwhile, the ten most frequently used non-lexical filler words and those used the least in the three corpora are discussed, followed by a pragmatic analysis of non-lexical filler words used by Chinese EFL learners and native English speakers.

References

Arnold, J. E., Fagnano, M., & Tanenhaus, M. K. (2003). Disfluencies signal theee, um, new information. Journal of Psy-cholinguistic Research, 32, (1): 25-36. http://doi.org/10.1023/A:1021980931292.

Bailey, K. G., & Ferreira, F. (2003). Disfluencies affect the parsing of garden-path sentences. Journal of Memory and Language, 49, 183-200. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0749-596X(03)00027-5.

Belikova, A., & White, L. (2009). Evidence for the fundamental difference hypothesis or not? Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 31, 199-223. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0272263109090287.

Bortfeld, H., Leon, S. D., Bloom, J. E., Schober, M. F., & Brennan, S. E. (2001). Disfluency rates in conversation: Effects of age, relationship, topic, role, and gender. Language and Speech, 44(2), 123-147. 

https://doi.org/10.1177/00238309010440020101.

Brotherton, P. (1979). Speaking and not speaking: Processes for translating ideas into speech. In Of Speech and Time, A. W. Siegman and S. Feldstein (eds.), 179-209. New York: Wiley.

Clark, H. H., & Fox Tree, J. E. (2002). Using uh and um in spontaneous speaking. Cognition, 84, 73-111. 

https://doi.org/10.1016/S0010-0277(02)00017-3.

Fox Tree, J. E. (1995). The effects of false starts and repetitions on the processing of subsequent words in spontaneous speech. Journal of Memory and Language, 34,709-738. https://doi.org/10.1006/jmla.1995.1032.

Goodwin, C. (1987). Forgetfulness as an Interactive Resource. Social Psychology, 50(2), 115-130. 

https://doi.org/10.2307/2786746.

Laserna, C. M., Seih, Y. T., & Pennebaker, J. W. (2014). Um... who like says you know: Filler word use as a function of age, gender, and personality. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 33(3), 328-338.

Lei, L. (2008). Use of idioms in Chinese EFL learners’ spoken English: evidence from SECCL and COLSEC. Teaching English in China, (6), 82-90.

Leng, Y. (2020). A Corpus-based Comparative Study of Contrastive Discourse Markers Used by Native English Speak-ers and Chinese EFL Learners in Spoken English. [Master’s thesis, Chongqing University]. 

https://kns.cnki.net/KCMS/detail/detail.aspx?dbname=CMFD202202&filename=1020356250.nh

McEnery, T., Xiao, R., & Tono, Y. (2006). Corpus-based language studies: An advanced resource book. Routledge.

Muhlack, B. (2020). L1 and L2 production of non-lexical hesitation particles of German and English native speakers. In Laughter and Other Non-Verbal Vocalisations Workshop: Proceedings.

O’Connell, D. C., & Kowal, S. (2004). The history of research on the filled pause as evidence of the written language bias in linguistics (Linell, 1982). Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 33, 459-474. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10936-004-2666-6.

Reynolds, A. & Paivio, A. (1968). Cognitive and emotional determinants of speech. Canadian Journal of Psychology, 22 (3), 164-175.

Schachter, S., Christenfield, N., Ravina, B., & Bilous, F. (1991). Speech disfluency and the structure of knowledge. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60, 362-367.

Smith, V. L., & Clark, H. H. (1993). On the course of answering questions. Journal of Memory and Language, 32, 25.

Tran, B. D., Latif, K., Reynolds, T. L., Park, J., Elston Lafata, J., Tai-Seale, M., & Zheng, K. (2023). “Mm-hm”, “Uh-uh”: are non-lexical conversational sounds deal breakers for the ambient clinical documentation technology? Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 30(4), 703-711. https://doi.org/10.1093/jamia/ocad001.

Watanabe, M., Hirose, K., Den, Y., & Minematsu, N. (2008). Filled pauses as cues to the complexity of upcoming phrases for native and non-native listeners. Speech Communication, 50, 81-94. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.specom.2007.06.002.

Wei, N., Li, W., & Pu, J. (2007). Design principles and annotation methods of the COLSEC corpus. Contemporary Linguistics, 9(3), 12.

Wei, W. (2016). A Corpus-Based Contrastive Analysis on the Use of Discourse Marker and in Oral English between Chinese EFL Learners and Native Speakers. [Master’s thesis, Shandong Normal University]. 

https://kns.cnki.net/KCMS/detail/detail.aspx?dbname=CMFD201701&filename=1016082730.nh.

Wen, Q., Liang, M., & Yan, X. (2009). Spoken and Written English Corpus of Chinese Learners 2.0. Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press.

Worku, H. (2019). Manifestations of lexical retrieval struggle and the role of iconic gestures in lexical retrieval. [Master’s thesis].

Zhu, G., Caceres, J. P., & Salamon, J. (2022). Filler word detection and classification: A dataset and benchmark. Proc. Interspeech 2022, 3769-3773. https://doi: 10.21437/interspeech.2022-10992.

Zhu, R. (2019). A Corpus-based Comparative Study of the Function of Discourse Marker Anyway between Chinese EFL Learners and Native English Speakers. [Master’s thesis, Northwest Normal University]. 

https://kns.cnki.net/KCMS/detail/detail.aspx?dbname=CMFD202001&filename=1019072907.nh.

How to cite this paper

A Corpus-based Comparative Analysis on the Use of Non-lexical Filler Words in Spoken English Between Chinese EFL Learners and Native English Speakers

How to cite this paper: Qiqi Huang. (2024) A Corpus-based Comparative Analysis on the Use of Non-lexical Filler Words in Spoken English Between Chinese EFL Learners and Native English SpeakersJournal of Humanities, Arts and Social Science8(1), 266-272.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/jhass.2024.01.046